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goodman in your first book "the exception to the rulers" you right and we we are quoting the "washington post" here that amy goodman is the journalist as uninvited guests. >> guest: we are not supposed to be a party to any party. we are journalists. there is a reason why our profession journalism is the only one explicitly protected by the u.s. constitution. we are supposed to be the check and balance on power. >> host: in-app look also war and peace, life and death. that is the role of the media in a democratic society to provide a forum for this discourse to do anything less is a disservice to the servicemen and service women of this country. >> guest: that's right. you know i had just flown in from denver where is that they national conference on media reform and when we flew into the airport at denver airport where people hold up signs when you come out to pick you up. as we were walking there were some soldiers there. they were going to be picking up the general and as we walked by they were waiting. i thought maybe the journalist behind me could see the sign for the general. we wen
and latin at the catholic university in washington. in his honor i tried to come up with an appropriate latin quote for addressing student debt and i suggest -- that is happy is he who has no debt. [laughter] >> that's good. [laughter] ski thank you. bill and david we look forward to your presentation of this provocative look and bill we welcome you to the aei podium. [applause] >> thank you alex. we were in the same class with the same major of philosophy were it not for the honor system i wouldn't have copied from alexis blue books. we had final exams and we had saturday classes. remember that? i won't describe the book. i will describe some basic familiarity with it and describe the high points in brief remarks. one of the things we said at the very beginning of the book combat the very beginning of the book is that two-thirds of the people who graduate from high school and immediately enroll in a four-year college probably do something else and we talk about various options like community college or get a job for a year or two or military or other things. we say this based on what w
the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. 50 years have passed. 50 years have passed since king's voice soared over the washington monuments declaring his dream, i have a dream. it is a dream deeply wounded in the american dream. and yesterday while i was watching president obama's inaugural address i heard echoes of king's speech. i have a dream. and when i turned off my television set, i spent a few minutes reflecting on the question. are all of us, all of us truly welcome to share in this dream, the same dream that dr. king dreamed? most americans i'm sure can recite portions of dr. kings i have a dream speech. it's an extraordinary and very familiar speech. i have are unaccustomed to hearing clips of his speech played over and over, recycled over and over on the radio every january. they're the favorite quotes, the favorite lines and now that i have school-aged children i see how king has explained to them in classrooms. when i was in elementary school there was no martin luther king day. no discussion of his heroism in classrooms but when my children came home from school j
this sort of culture of cable, the culture of telecom. we talked a lot about the culture of washington. what is the culture of silicon valley? how does that play into this? >> guest: what is silicon valley? demint, for me to just like espn , gigantic very successful content companies without which the infrastructure guys cannot survive. you have to think of this as a powerful negotiation. they need each other. for those companies, they're not going to rock the boat with this particular policy problem. they looked like a monopoly, so that no one to be in that sentence. if you're saying silicon valley is to go and facebook, they're like giant bullies in the schoolyard who are all in their particular corners. they have the markets. they don't really be each other out. the status quo is locked in place. i'm hopeful there is another silicon valley, upstarts, smaller companies, companies is future will be depended on a lot of information flowing to an addressable market in america that is not subject to the gatekeepers control. they should really be exercised and say, how can this be that my desti
ford was called to washington and told, we desperately need engines for the raf. can you make them? he said, oh, sure, we can turn out quite a few of those. he went back and told his father what he had said, and then with an embarrassed face had to tell washington that we can't do it because my father will not build any goods for foreign government. he'll make them for americans but not make them for foreign governments. so that order ended up with chrysler, which didn't have the same qualms. the opposition to the war, and to getting not only getting into it -- that was widespread but even helping the allies was incredibly strong, and roosevelt had to literally walk a tightrope. the first thing he ended up doing, of course, was running for president for an unprecedented third term, because he did not want to leave the country bereft of leadership. and he did not announce, by the way, he was going to run for the third term until the democratic convention met in july of 1940. and everybody was playing the will he or won't he? it was the great washington lottery of the spring of 1940. whe
be taken to mitigate the potential threat against our diplomatic asset. from analysis in washington, d.c., monitoring our threat to the regional security officers abroad, managing the security programs at the posts, we strive to provide the most secure platform for conducting american diplomacy. building on the recommendations of the independent benghazi accountability review board, the interagency assessment team that were sent out, and our own considerable experience and expertise, the department is diligently working to improve the way we protect our diplomat not only at our highest threat posts but all of our facilities around the world. thank you in large part your support in 2014 continuing resolution, progress is well underway. pursuant to the recommendations of the independent be amo u.s. foreign affair community personnel to deal with high-threat, and high-risk environment through our foreign affairs cowrpt threat course. we're expanding the duration of ds high threat tactical training courses and incorporating element of the training to the other ds courses so that regardless
right harriet washington who is deadly monopolies the shocking corporate takeover of life itself and the consequences for your health and our medical future. please give her a welcome. [applause] i am going to start the conversation among us by first asking what mythologies did we all learn from writing our books that we would want to share with the audience today and discuss amongst ourselves? i am going to start with three myths that i learned from writing genetic justice which was really about forensic dna. you know when you watch all these crimes, programs on tv. dna rules it seems so these are the three myths that i learned. first of all myth number one that dna profiles are like fingerprints. not true. very different. myth number two is that dna evidence is infallible. also not true. it's not infallible for prosecutions and it's not infallible for exonerations. myth number three, collecting dna profiles is race-neutral. that is also a great myth. so let me turn now to alondra and maybe you can tell us what some of the myths were that you discovered in your work, body and so
. but when it comes to health care decisions being made in washington lately, the only thing the government is doing well is increasing partisanship and legislative grir legislativ. the president and democrats need to listen. it's time to admit that this partisan experiment in government-run health care is failing. in order for this to get better, they must acknowledge the problem. some of the law's authors and biggest supporters admit this law is a mess and it will only get worse. however, those in the democratic leadership continue to support flawed health care laws out of pride, politics or the belief that the government knows best. it makes no sense to stubborn leighly cling to a law that is so massive and bureaucratally confusing that it collapses under its own weight. congress can give the proponents the way out. the key is finding common ground. more often than not the country hears about what divides congress. we could have the kind of step-by-step reforms that would protect americans. i believe members of congress on both sides of the aisle can agree on 80% of an issue 100% of the
is jessica cooper burgh and i'm from seattle, washington. you were appointed in 2004 by president george w. bush and he spoke about how the u.s. inspired socialism. i was wondering if you could take a second to talk about the ethical implications of universal health care and what your opinions are on that. >> okay. well, there is no question that we need health care reform in this country. we spend twice as much per capita in this country and yet we have tremendous access problems and there is an enormous amount of waste and efficiency in our system. so that is not going to be corrected by throwing more money out there. it is going to be corrected by doing intelligent things. so for instance if you get an appendectomy in birmingham versus new york city versus detroit, different costs, different ways of collecting, all of which justify the mountains of paper involved in the armies of people that have to be paid out of the health care dollar. that is absolute craziness. when every diagnosis has something that is an icd-9 code. and we have computers as well. which means that it can all be don
george washington was leading a ragtag army and ask for money a very long time ago. >> well, i think it is quite clear that congress has the power -- >> the right and responsibility. was asking -- i know i need to yield back, but the power is a different question. the right and responsibility under the constitution, wouldn't you say that is clearly within the four squares of our constitution? >> particularly the word responsibility is putting a spin on it that i don't think is necessary. i would not necessarily want to add to that, but certainly there is a power. that is what congress is for, and that is what politics is all about. >> mr. chairman, i don't want to engage in politics. the term responsibility to me means a lot. i note to my democratic friends and you, mr. chairman, right and responsibility of the constitution means a lot to us. i yield back. >> mr. cartwright. >> thank you, mr. chairman. this hearing is nothing but another partisan attack on the affordable care act. the gentleman's comments about not engaging in politics notwithstanding. isn't it a coincidence that it
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